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Trump Fans And Foes Break Bread At Washington Dinner Party

WAMU | Carmel Delshad | March 13, 2017

It’s Tuesday night and Philippa Hughes is putting together the finishing touches on dinner. The smell of chicken baking in a cast iron pan floats through the air as water and coconut milk boil on the stove. Hughes is hosting a dinner party for strangers to talk politics over pasta. It’s an idea that could very easily get messy, and maybe that’s only appropriate for an idea borne from a messy presidential election.

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This Clinton fan invited Trump supporters for dinner. Healing divides isn’t so easy.

PBS News Hour | Rhana Natour | March 7, 2017  

An hour before her dinner guests were set to arrive, Philippa Hughes was surprisingly prepared. “The entire menu tonight is red and blue themed,” the 48-year-old art curator said giddily as she laid out a platter of blue corn chips, red grapes and blue cheese. Her colorful apartment in the U Street neighborhood of Washington, D.C. was filled with the smell of roast beef; a pot of linguine simmered on the stovetop.

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Light in the Tunnel

On Tap | Monica Alford | March 2017

I was standing with the nonprofit’s managing director, David Ross, and board member Philippa Hughes of Pink Line Project, staring down the length of a pitch-black tunnel that was suddenly illuminated by bright, kaleidoscopic projections that seemed to pulsate to the beat of the music filling every inch of the immense space. I was completely mesmerized.

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US + THEM = U.S.

Bmore Art | Mike Iavcone | February 9, 2017

Mike Iacovone writes about US + THEM = U.S.: Finding Ground in a Divided Nation, Curated by Philippa Hughes and Deirdre Darden

Considering the timing of this exhibit, just one week before the inauguration of Donald J. Trump, and considering the title of the show, and the depressing dark cloud that has hovered over Washington DC since November 8th, I expected it to be something very different. I imagined angry artists reacting to the dangerous changes that our country is facing. I imagined protest. What they gave me was a calm and meditative breath that I hadn’t experienced in a long time.

Read More from Mike Iavcone at Bmore Art

 

Pop Your Political Bubble

U.S News | Susannah Wellford | February 7, 2017

"She is a liberal and didn't vote for Trump, but she approached the dinners with no agenda beyond getting everyone a little closer to understanding where the other side is coming from."

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LIVE AT THE WONDERLAND BALLROOM

You, Me, Them, Everybody | January 13, 2017

Comes in at the 19:48 mark.
 

 

 

Goodbye Obama, Hello Trump: The D.C Region’s Arts Scene Under A New Administration

THE KOJO NNAMDI SHOW | JANUARY 12, 2017

Over the last decade, the arts scene in and around D.C. has been a hot topic for developers, patrons and the artists themselves. The Obama administration displayed a clear appreciation for the arts and brought some Hollywood glamour to the District, including renowned visiting artists. But how much influence does an administration have over the arts landscape nationally and in this region? As the transition to the Trump administration nears, we consider the ways in which the arts scene has flourished in the city and how it might both be challenged and continue to thrive in the years ahead.

To listen at The Kojo Nnamdi Show, click here.

 
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Arts Advocate Hosts 'Trump Dinner' To Meet Supporters Of President-Elect

DCIST| RACHEL KURZIUS | DECEMBER 13, 2016

It’s been more than a month since the election, and D.C. arts advocate Philippa Hughes is “still fucking angry about it, no question,” she says. Like many Washingtonians wondering “WTF now?” Hughes is trying to figure out what to do in the wake of Donald Trump’s surprise victory. “I thought—what am I really good at?” she says. “I’m good at bringing people together and organizing fun things for people to do.” So that’s what the founder of The Pink Line Project did—she organized a dinner for six, including three conservatives, two of whom voted for Trump, on Sunday evening.

To read more from Rachel Kurzius at DCist, click here.

 

Be a better neighbor

SEVEN:THIRTY | Lily Strelich | Nov 21, 2016

If you braved the wind this weekend and happened to stroll through Park View, you might have seen the faces of your neighbors projected onto Georgia Avenue walls and storefronts.

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Encouraging Neighbors to See Eye to Eye

City Lab | Jessica Leigh Hester | November 17, 2016 

Illuminated faces loom large in storefronts and street corners along lower Georgia Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. Some are backgrounded by humming cars, others by chain link fences, or patterned wallpaper. They blink, smile, or turn slightly as wind musses their hair.

Read more from City Lab

 

The Story Behind SEE/CHANGE: An Interview with Philippa Hughes

BYT | SVETLANA | November 16, 2016

In this time of uncertainty, art projects that focus on building and engaging communities are more important than ever. Art can be a catalyst for conversation that brings people together, closes the gaps between us. SEE/CHANGE, a public art video installation that is part of this week’s programming is one of those catalysts, engaging the community along the lower Georgia Ave. corridor. We caught up with Philippa Hughes ofPinkline Project, the driving force behind SEE/CHANGE, which runs through November 20.

Read More from BYT

 
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D.C. Announces Plans for 15 Citywide, Pop-up Art Projects

DCIST| CHRISTINA STURDIVANT | MAY 5, 2016

The District’s Office of Planning announced today an initiative to get pop-up art projects planted throughout the city. The program, dubbed Crossing the Street: Building DC’s Inclusive Future through Creative Placemaking, “will promote community-building in neighborhoods that are experiencing rapid demographic and social change,” according to a release.

To read more from Christina Sturdivant at DCist, click here.

 

Forget ‘The One.’ Look for One of the Ones instead.

THE WASHINGTON POST| LISA BONOS | JUNE 17, 2015

I’ve never believed in “The One.” This term for the person you might choose to spend most of your life with has always seemed creepy, almost god-like and incredibly unrealistic. Recently, I spoke with my friend Philippa Hughes on her Women of Uncertain Age podcast about this concept of The One. She’s also a skeptic; take a listen. Hughes married the person she thought was The One when she was 23. Sixteen years later, they divorced, with about the last five of those being “tense and confusing,” as she writes in a recent blog post.

To read more from Lisa Bonos at The Washington Post, click here.

 

Schoolin’ Life: Philippa Hughes

LADY COLLECTIVE | MAY 1, 2015

In today’s edition of Schoolin’ Life, we sit down with lawyer turned arts and culture writer Philippa Hughes.

Philippa created the Pink Line Project to inspire creative thinking in everyone, to build community and connectivity, and to open portals to art and culture for the culturally curious. Her vision for DC: to change the way people view DC, both residents and visitors.

To read more from Lady Collective, click here.

 

100 Top Creatives

ORIGIN MAGAZINE | MARCH/APRIL 2015

Philippa P.B. Hughes is an ex-lawyer turned writer, speaker, podcaster, flaneur, provocateur and advocate for the arts and the temporary, creative use of vacant space.

My passion is to incite creative thinking in everyone around me, to build community and connectivity, and to open portals to art and culture for the culturally curious by living an examined life inspired by art and passion. I create inventive and collaborative environments in which people who would not normally have the opportunity to interact with each other can gather to experience art and culture in alternative and stimulating ways.

To view more creatives from Origin, click here.

 

Even for tiny lumps, more women are choosing double mastectomy

THE WASHINGTON POST | DEBORAH KOTZ | FEBRUARY 16, 2015

Nearly 25 years ago, the National Cancer Institute declared that women with early-stage breast cancer could be spared mastectomies. The institute acted after studies found that breast removal offered no survival benefits over removing just the lump and following up with radiation treatments. This caused the pendulum to swing hard away from mastectomies, from a rate of nearly 100 percent in the 1980s for patients with small tumors that had not spread beyond the breast or surrounding lymph nodes to less than 40 percent today.

Now, though, the pendulum is starting to swing back in a surprising way.

Phillipa Hughes, 46, first considered having a lumpectomy 18 months ago, when she was diagnosed with a small breast tumor, but she opted for a double mastectomy with reconstruction after speaking to other breast cancer patients through a support network.

To read the full article, click here.

 

DC Experts Discuss 2015

DC COOL | JANUARY 11, 2015

Nevin Martell, Lawrence Hamm and Philipa Hughes, respected DC authorities on dining, sports and the arts, respectively, chat about what they’re looking forward to in DC in 2015.

 

A Washington Halloween: It’s all politics in Dork City

THE WASHINGTON POST | ELLEN MCCARTHY | OCTOBER 30, 2014

It’s arrived once again. Halloween in Washington. Which means that it’s time to unmask our shadow selves, our inner animals, our not-so-alter-egos. In other words, come on out, you Hanging Chads and Swing States and pants-suited Hillarys.

“The whole smart thing is the biggest thing,” says Philippa Hughes, an artist and writer who has lived in Washington for 13 years. “Because that’s the biggest compliment you can give in this town,” where the costumes “are usually these nerdy, politically themed costumes.”

To read the full article, click here.

 

Contrast the Pursuit of Comfort

JOYRIDE | KELCEY | JULY 8, 2014

Yesterday I discovered Tina Roth Eisenberg, and her project Creative Mornings. I spotted a speech by Philippa Hughes, the founder of The Pink Line Project. PLP was a big deal in the D.C. arts scene. I felt any lesson she may have learned from the experience could be of value. I can appreciate many of the points she shared, especially her observation on the artist as a catalyst for urban renewal. That subject deserves its own post. Her main point, on the importance of seeking uncomfortable situations, sparked something worth further examination.

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

District Letters: A Guide to Non-Sucky Non-Fiction

BRIGHTEST YOUNG THINGS | KATE JENKINS | MAY 23, 2014

The consensus seems to be that entering any bookstore these days feels like stepping into a group therapy session. Copies of Life Has Been Hard for Me, Too: The Story of a Talk Show Host,Confessions of an EgomaniacFinding Myself After My Messy and Unfair Divorce, and My Super Interesting World Travels gather round, imploring you to understand their struggles, validate their existence. Literature has always been an exercise in empathy, but our recent obsession with memoir has many critics attempting to draw the line between deeply humanizing non-fiction works and books that are primarily dedicated either to whining, gloating, or asinine navel-gazing.

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Philippa on Fab.com

Fab.com | April 1, 2014

Modern problems. You’ve always longed for a regal animal mount to adorn the study wall—but you’re somewhat lacking in the sociopathology department and loath to kill an innocent creature. Well, this resin animal head is a perfectly logical (and beautiful) solution. Armed with this totem, you can still admire the silhouette of an animal in kingly repose,and treat guests to increasingly improbable tales about wrestling the sad-faced, screeching creature to the ground with your bare hands. 

To check out “The Philippa” click here.

 

Philippa Hughes: Founder of Pink Line Project

WHERE MAGAZINE | JEAN COHEN | JANUARY 27, 2014 BRIGHTEST YOUNG THINGS

This ex-attorney, self-described “contrarian” has made things happen here, showing up early on at open studios and gallery nights in vintage cocktail dresses, buzzing around the city on a pink (of course) Buddy motor scooter.Ultimately Hughes put her energy to building connections in the  community. She advised new collectors (“go with your gut”), underwrote  worthy art projects and bought for herself the work of established artists like Nicholas and Sheila Pye (a chromogenic print, pictured) plus riskier ones on the fringe. She served on an arts commission and a museum committee and produced events—from salons to music/art happenings, her “DIY underground.”

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Philippa Hughes: A D.C. Artist Living Like Her Hair Is On Fire

WAMU 88.5 | REBECCA SHEIR | JANUARY 24, 2014

Sometimes a fresh start can actually be a work in progress. And that’s definitely the case for 45-year-old D.C. resident Philippa Hughes.

“I think when people want to have a fresh start, they think a lightning bolt is going to come down and hit them, and everything is going to be great, or changed, or somehow different,” she says. “And in fact [my] change happened over a period of time. But the day I was diagnosed with cancer, I can point to as a day that everything did change. So I’ve labeled that day ‘the worst day of my life.”

“But all these things were already in motion,” she continues. “That just sort of accelerated everything. And then seeing that City Paper article was just like sort of the nail in the coffin as to ‘Old Philippa.'”

To read the full article click here.

 

After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Philippa Hughes Makes Big Changes

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER | KRISTON CAPPS | OCTOBER 23, 2013

But her summer has been abnormal in a singularly horrible way, too. On Aug. 29, Hughes was diagnosed with breast cancer. Two Sundays ago, she celebrated both her 45th birthday and National No Bra Day—this year, fate lumped them together—by burning bras with loved ones at a friend’s place in Maryland and toasting s’mores over the embers. On Monday, Hughes will check in at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, having spent the last month and a half preparing for a life-changing but necessary procedure: a double mastectomy.

In many respects, this summer has been a typical one for Philippa Hughes. But “typical” for Hughes means unreal in the best possible ways. The Pink Line Project founder spent two months eating and surfing in Los Angeles, Sicily, and Portland, Ore. She took a writing workshop in Maui conducted by authorRebecca Walker. At the beginning of October, she was baptized in the name of performance art by artist Holly Bass, dunked in the Capitol Skyline Hotel pool during the (e)merge Art Fair.”

To read the full article click here.

 

 

6 So-Chic Scooter Owners Show Us How They Ride In Style

REFINERY 29 | ADELE CHAPIN | JUNE 27, 2013

Talk about branding: Art collector and founder of The Pink Line Project Philippa P.B. Hughes encourages Washingtonians to “think pink” by showcasing the best of Washington’s creative community. So, of course, her scooter is pink. When she’s not zipping around town, she’s working on buzzy projects and planning the District’s next big art event.          

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 

Super Star

DC MODERN LUXURY MAGAZINE | TIFFANY JOW | JUNE 2013

Arts visionary Philippa Hughes doesn’t dream in miniature. Her ideas are colossal portraits of daring and panache. So, when Rosslyn came calling a couple years ago and asked Hughes to pitch ideas for an arts project, she came up with two ambitious ideas. Still, Hughes never dreamed her patrons would pick the most outrageous one: Supernova, a citywide performance arts festival that kicks off this month.

 

 

 

Behind the Mind Radio Show

BTM RADIO | MAY 28, 2013

Listen Here 

 

Literary Death Match: Ep. 5 at the Kennedy Center

LITERARY DEATH MATCH | JANUARY 31, 2013

The mic was then handed over to the trio of all-star judges: New Yorker editor Ben Greenman (author of What He’s Poised to Do and Superbad), creator of the fabulous Pink Line ProjectPhilippa Hughes, and comedian Remy Munasifi (a.k.a. GoRemy and the auteur of “The Falafel Album”). Greenman loved how Wilbur’s opener “put everyone else’s work in ridiculous context” and used “good literary writing to mock good literary writing,” while Hughes was reminded of the time she was in Cuba and Fidel Castro gave her a mojito mixed with the time she was climbing Mount Everest and lost a few fingers (her fingers, by the way, were intact). Finally, Munasifi chimed in with how he loved Wilbur’s book because he read it, and was able to “quit reading well before [he] ever started.” About Parkhurst, Greenman loved how she was the only reader who dressed to match the Kennedy Center, while Hughes praised Parkhurst’s soothing voice and presentation. Finally, Munasifi quipped that Parkhurst’s reading was before the most-ever severed president heads, but she didn’t balk in the least.

The judges then huddled, and by the narrowest of margins decided it was Parkhurst who would advance as the night’s first finalist.

 

Slice of Life: Alex Goldstein, keeper of D.C.’s graffiti art scene

WTOP | JANUARY 27, 2013

Do you only DJ here or do you DJ in other places?

I have DJ’ed in a number of pop-up events around town over the years, like for Philippa Hughes, for example. She does cultural art events like this thing called Cherry Blast. It’s every year, and I have DJ’ed at clubs and for private events. I mean, many years ago there were a lot of clubs that aren’t there anymore.

To read the rest of the article, click here. 

 

The Unknown Art

Consider yourself a performance art novice?  The Unknown Art provides an excellent explanation and example of performance art, including perspectives from George Washington University professor Kate Mattingly, performance artists Melissa Krodman and Kelly Bond, and myself!

Listen More

 

Unlike Four Years Ago, No Rush Yet on Inaugural Tickets, Hotel Rooms

MEDILL WASHINGTON | AIMEE CHEN | DECEMBER 3, 2012 

Plans for President Barack Obama’s second inauguration in January are in full swing. A reviewing stand is under construction in front of the White House, congressional offices are taking ticket requests and planners are mapping out parade logistics and street closures.

But if a crush of well-wishers is hoping to descend on the nation’s capital as it did four years ago, when 1.8 million people crowded into the city to be a part of his history-making swearing-in, their preparations are off to a much more leisurely start.

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Pink Line Project Support for The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart

PETER MILLER | DECEMBER 6, 2012

If you produce a show inside a bar, you might find people interested in seeing it in other bars. Example: The Pink Line Project is an endeavor to raise the visibility of the arts in Greater Washington, DC and to use the arts and that greater visibility to encourage people to cross social borders that tend to balkanize our region. It is a passion project for its founder Philippa Hughes. They do a lot to promote arts attendance and participation.  

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

Famous 5: Philippa Hughes

FAMOUS DC | BRITTANY HOROWITZ | OCTOBER 17, 2012

Philippa is a well-known art collector and art connector in DC who is famously known for creating the Pink Line Project, a consolidated and searchable calendar of all things cool and creative in DC. FamousDC was lucky enough to chat with Philippa about the DC art scene and what makes our city just as fun as any other. Here is what she had to say about the past and present.  

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

Cafritz, Philippa Hughes Parse Barbara Kruger’s Text

BLOOMBERG | STEPHANIE GREEN | AUGUST 22, 2012

Art collector Philippa Hughes and other guests ate roast beef sandwiches and sipped champagne in the main-level bookshop, which will be demolished in the coming days. Hard hats were part of the decor to say farewell to the store, which has been in its current location for 27 years. 

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

Pink Line Project on What Weekly

WHAT WEEKLY | TRISTAN BROOKS | AUGUST 9, 2012

If a dog gets paint on its paws, Pink Line Project knows about it. D.C.’s premiere arts and culture blog, Pink Line catches anything remotely artsy, and, in the words of founder Philippa Hughes, spoon-feeds it to the masses. Taking a quick look at the site, there are 20 events listed on Pink Line’s calendar today, 15 blog posts have been written since last Thursday, and all of this has been curated in the sake of connecting capital folk with the art occurring around them. In order to find out more about how this enterprise got started, the state of D.C.’s arts scene, and how to become the best arts site in the city, we talked to Hughes.

To read the rest of this article click here

 

 

Mintwood Place Brunch

BITCHES WHO BRUNCH | BECCA | AUGUST 10, 2012

Yes, I totally picked up a girl in a bar. I even got her business card. And then I reached out, because, well, Philippa Hughes just sort of seems like the interesting artsy chick that you would totally want to sit next to at a D.C. dinner party. She calls herself a “Chief Creative Contrarian,” but most in D.C. call her the Patron Saint of Washington’s arts scene.

And, well, why wouldn’t you want to be friends with someone who quit her cushy law firm job to found and run D.C.’s biggest arts website? She not only has her finger on the pulse of every arts event and artist in town, she is more than likely the woman behind them.

So we scheduled brunch, duh, and I suggested Mintwood Place, which is nestled between Perry’s and Cashion’s Eat Place on the edge of Adams Morgan. She arrived late; she had walked there in the heat from her 14th Street pad, still reeling from the prior evening’s artistic adventures (namely: a rooftop music session with Margot MacDonald. Um, awesome.)

To read the rest of the article click here

 

 

Interview with Astral Radio

ASTRAL RADIO | JIM RICHARDS | AUGUST 8, 2012

Philippa is interviewed by Astral Radio to discuss the idea of free expression within art in relation to the current controversy surrounding the arrest and trial of Pussy Riot band members.

Click here to listen to the interview!

 

Art Is Where You Find It

HOLLYWOOD ON THE POTOMAC | DONNA SHORT | AUGUST 4, 2012

Philippa Hughes, a lawyer turned art collector, has been described as an art activist for her work in spotlighting young artists, helping them reach wider audiences. Creative and innovative, she organizes large public events, and is known for her art-focused parties, and their unexpected themes and venues.

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Interview with Philippa Hughes

THE POST REALITY SHOW | RANDALL PACKER | JULY 20 & JULY 28, 2012

 

Philippa Hughes Interviewing Capital Fringe Festival Artist

THE POST REALITY SHOW | RANDALL PACKER | JULY 20 & JULY 28, 2012

 

Randall Packer Interviewing Philippa Hughes

THE POST REALITY SHOW | RANDALL PACKER | JULY 20 & JULY 28, 2012

 

How to Collect Art – Tips for Collecting Art

REFINERY 29 | BRITTANY MARTIN | JUNE 26, 2012

We love surrounding ourselves with beautiful things: From the clothes we buy to the way we decorate our homes, our aesthetic choices have a serious impact on our quality of life. Collecting and displaying art — no matter the medium — can enhance your space, inspire you on a daily basis, and help support hard-working artists, to boot.

To put it another way, it’s like 3-D Pinterest. But it can also be a little intimidating, particularly when you’re buying on a budget. Luckily, gallery openings aren’t the only entrée into the art world — and we’re here to hook you up with an at-home tutorial. What it boils down to: You just need to figure out what you love, and then, when you see it, snap it up — and hang it up.

So, we sought out advice from three art-loving local ladies — a collector, a designer, and a painter — to help you turn any blank wall into your own personal gallery. Click through to meet them, see their personal pieces, and get some top-notch tips for starting your own creative collection.

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

 

Borderstan People: Philippa Hughes, The Pink Line Project

BORDERSTAN | RACHEL NANIA AND LUIS GOMEZ | JUNE 8, 2012

I started out by blogging about my personal interest in contemporary visual art and hosting salons in my home for creatives. These things grew to the point where I started to realize that there was a real need for something that would connect people through the arts. I started Pink Line with the idea that somehow I would make the arts more accessible by giving people easy entry points that were fun and welcoming with the hope that that would get them started on a lifelong love for the arts. Some people might not have gotten the early exposure to arts that many of us were lucky enough to have, so we have to start by providing simple baby steps to get people started. Oh, and because people always ask me, the Pink Line is a reference to the metro system. The difference is that it doesn’t just go from point A to Point B. The Pink Line connects everything together through the arts!

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

Would You Like Fries With Your Performance Art?

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER | SUDIP BHATTACHARYA | MAY 16, 2012 

From the start, art doyenne Philippa Hughes has said she’s all about making art accessible. The only problem with making arts accessible via art party, of course, is that people still must elect to go to the art party.

Evangelizing for performance art might be even tougher. Or at the very least, Hughes says, the form faces a slight stigma, even though it can force a deeper level of engagement.

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

Artomatic for the People

THE WASHINGTON POST | KATIE ABERBACH | MAY 17, 2011

Philippa Hughes, an art collector and “chief creative contrarian” for the D.C.-based arts group the Pink Line Project (who herself has hosted panel discussions at Artomatic in previous years), sees the event as essential to D.C.’s ongoing evolution as an arts city. “I think to have a rich arts scene, you just need to have as much art as possible in as many venues as possible,” she says. “I love going to galleries and museums, but people don’t just appear there; they have to start somewhere.”

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

For Artist and Patron, Sharing Space Is a Piece of (Art)work

THE WASHINGTON POST | KRISTON CAPPS | MAY 16, 2011

Testing the boundaries of the artist-collector relationship, Philippa Hughes hosted Pittsburgh-based artist Agnes Bolt in her home for a week. Taking up nearly all of Hughes’ living space, Agnes was sequestered in a transparent polycarbonate enclosure. Both Agnes and Philippa spent the week adhereing to a predetermined contract of rules, which dictated the way the interacted and inevitably created tension. But by the end of the week, the artist and the collector had arrived at a mutual understanding, Hughes saying, “I Sincerely hope there’s a way she can take the material she gathered over the past seven days and turn it into something universally relevant. It wasn’t about Agnes and Philippa.”

To read the full article click here.

 

 

The Charlie Visconage Show

THE CHARLIE VISCONAGE | MAY 4, 2012 

 

Can A Party Change Perceptions Of Anacostia?

DCENTRIC | ELAHE IZADI | APRIL 24, 2012 

But Hughes didn’t throw Cherry Blast in order to put Anacostia on the map. ”That’s one thing, and an important thing,” she said. “But what it’s about for me is showing that D.C. is more than politicians and lawyers. It also has a thriving arts and culture scene. Some of it is happening in Anacostia, and some of it [in other parts] of the city.”

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

LUMEN8 Anacostia

READYSETDC | RAMSEY LANIER | APRIL 17, 2012

Not only was the LUMEN8 festival successful at driving economicgrowth, it was also a great moment in which people could get togetherand share ideas. “We were thrilled to be part of this amazingcommunity-based event. It proved that the arts can bring people together and start conversations that might not have normally happenedotherwise.” said Philippa Hughes, founder of The Pink Line Project, whoplayed a pivotal part in bringing the entire event together. “I’m really looking forward to doing it again this Saturday at Cherry Blast!”

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

 

Why You Should Pay Attention to Lumen8Anacostia

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER | JONATHAN L/ FISSCHER | APRIL 13, 2012

Hughes, while acknowledging that many factors contribute to economic development, subscribes to the tenet that undergirds most temporary-urbanism initiatives: “Nobody’s going to invest in the neighborhood unless they think that people will come.” That’s what Lumen8 hopes to demonstrate.

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

The 3-Minute Interview: Philippa Hughes

THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER | COURTNEY ZOTT | JANUARY 26, 2012

You call yourself “Chief Creative Contrarian” of the project. What is it about the mainstream culture in D.C. that you oppose?

Well, I have two ideas. One is that I am not an artist and I know there are lots of people like me who are not but still want to be around creative people. So my focus is how do I give access to creative people to the people who are like me, people who are working regular jobs — lawyers, lobbyists — who want to find a way to access creativity. It’s not about becoming an artist, but just surrounding yourself with art.

To read the rest of this article click here.

 

D.C. Tweeps 2011: Finally, the winners

THE WASHINGTON POST | KATIE ROGERS | JANUARY 3, 2012

“Washington is home to some of the most plugged-in, powerful people in the nation, and The Washington Post follows those influencers closely. But not all of the limelight should fall on the Typical Washington Insider, and that’s where D.C. Tweeps comes in. When we created D.C. Tweeps in 2010, our aim was to learn more about the people on Twitter who informed you, entertained you and even kept you fed during an average day. We thought of it this way: If Washington’s Twitter scene is one big, packed-to-the-gills menu, we wanted to hear a little bit more about your daily diet.”

To read the rest of this article click here

 

Tradition! 8 In-The-Know Locals Share Their Most Special Holiday Customs

REFINERY 29 | HOLLY E. THOMAS | DECEMBER 22, 2011

Holiday traditions, whether they’re silly or sentimental, are our favorite all-natural upper — they make you feel all warm and fuzzy, brighten your spirits, and create the feeling of connection, even when you’re far from home. While we have our own list of must-dos around this time of year, we’re always more than a little curious to see how others celebrate. Okay, okay, so we’re a bit nosy — but you’ll thank us when you’re adopting these heartwarming (and hilarious) traditions for yourself. We tapped some D.C. residents who are shaking up the scene in a major way, whether it’s a chef on a winning streak or a tireless — and on-top-of-her-game — media guru. They’ve shared their most-loved holiday traditions with us, and we’re delighted to share them with you before we OD on cuteness. That’s just how we roll — always sharing and caring!

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

 

Occupy D.C. hunger striker appears in street art

THE WASHINGTON POST | MAURA JUDKIS | DECEMBER 21, 2011

Philippa Hughes, the founder of the Washington-based art company Pink Line Project, saw the wheatpaste depiction of Parsons at 14th Street and Swann, Northwest, Wednesday morning and snapped a photo of it. She said she’s not sure who created it. “Lean and Hungry” is the name of a local theater group, but when contacted, the group denied any responsibility (Exact quote from the group: “Wild. Thanks!”).

 

To read the rest of the post click here.

 

 

10 Luxurious Gifts to Give

CAPITOL FILE | DECEMBER 6, 2011

Philippa P. B. Hughes’s title at The Pink Line Project is chief creative contrarian—apropos, as Hughes is leading the charge when it comes to spicing up DC ’s cultural climate. Hughes and Pink Line connect and celebrate everything art-related in the Washington area: heralding new talent, announcing gallery shows and events, and promoting innovative ideas. Which is why when Hughes professed her love of Joel D’Orazio’s work, we immediately knew he was deserving of a place on our gift list.

To read the rest of this post click here.

 

Creative convergence: Washington’s new gallery scene

THE WASHINGTON POST | LAVANYA RAMANATHAN AND STEPHANIE MERRY | NOVEMBER 17, 2011 

“The gallery system is still the tippy-top ideal in some ways,” adds D.C. Arts and Humanities commissioner Philippa Hughes, noting that a handful of conventional galleries have also opened in the past year. But Hughes, whose own first art events in Washington were the definition of pop-up parties, says she sees these art spaces — only one of which calls itself a gallery — as evidence of the broadening scene: Thanks to technology and social media, she says, the gatekeepers are transforming considerably, to include those with little formal art training but plenty of ambition. “We don’t have to wait for a gallery to anoint us anymore,” she says.

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Is Washington D.C. the Best Place for Independent and Emerging Artists?

MEET OBSESSION | SARAH MARLOFF | NOVEMBER 8, 2011 

Most people would consider cities like San Francisco and Manhattan the artistic Meccas. Those who call these cities home revel in the artistic culture that they’ve had a hand in creating, while fledgling artists dream of moving there. One the other hand, cities like Washington D.C. have begun to build an independent art scene, but have a difficult time attracting emerging artists.  Philippa Hughes, creator and “Chief Creative Contrarian” of the district’s Pink Line Project has been involved with the city’s art scene since it started.

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Chat with the Going Out Gurus: Philippa Hughes

WASHINGTON POST | LAVANYA RAMANATHAN | NOVEMBER 8, 2011 

We are about to be knee-deep in art openings/parties/talks this weekend, so naturally, the Going Out Gurus turned to art and culture maven Philippa Hughes to help us wade through it all in this week’s got plans?chat.

To read the rest of the article click here.

To read a related article click here.

 

 

The Closer: Hughes The Boss

MODERN LUXURY | NOVEMBER 1, 2011 

Philippa Hughes, founder of DC’s go-to-art-events Database, The Pinkline Project, chats about her artistic role at DCWEEK’S closing party.

To read the rest of the article click here

 

Emerging Visual Artists Elect DC

VANDERBILT | PAULA CLEGGETT | OCTOBER 12, 2011 

Philippa Hughes, one of 17 volunteer DC Arts Commissioners, says that, “it’s not just the Smithsonian . . . it’s the Capitol, its K Street, I mean, that’s our industry here and its powerful and overwhelming and it really does pervade everything. So, it is really hard for a creative class to really thrive, when this city actually is built on something that is not creative at all.”

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Meet Philippa Hughes, the Art Outsider Behind the Pink Line Project

SCOUTMOB | MARISSA PAYNE | SEPTEMBER 27, 2011

Don’t confuse Philippa Hughes, the creator of The Pink Line Project, with an art insider. “I’m not,” she said. “And I don’t want to be. I hope people don’t view me that way!” This may sound ironic coming from a woman whose name is recognizable to just about everyone in DC’s creative community, but it makes sense when you realize what it is Philippa does.

To read the rest of the article, click here.

 

For photographer E. Brady Robinson, the stuff on desks is the stuff of portraits

THE WASHINGTON POST | KATHERINE BOYLE | SEPTEMBER 2, 2011 

She contacted self-described arts connector Philippa Hughes shortly after photographing Miller’s desk. Hughes, the founder of the Pink Line Project, helped Robinson make a list of Washington arts notables, and within 24 hours, Robinson had invitations to photograph the desks of Anne Goodyear at the National Portrait Gallery, arts collector James Alefantis and Andy Grundberg at the Corcoran College of Art and Design. The immediate, positive response stunned Robinson.

For the rest of the article, click here.

 

Obsession in Portraiture Series

MEETS OBSESSION | KATE REEDER | AUMTUM/WINTER 2011

Everywhere I go, I scan the streets for art and take pictures. I’ve interrupted many conversation and been late to many appointments while taking time to capture these images. I am so obsessed with street art that I have asked several artists to make pieces on the walls and ceiling inside my apartment!

 

 

Tabaq Bistro Hosts DC Council on Humanities’ Panel “ABC’S of DC: Americans, Blogs, and Culture

DC EVENT JUNKIE | SUMMER WHITFORD | AUGUST 11,  2011 

Philippa Hughes started her blog Pink Line Project because, “I see my blog as a way to change the way people see DC, both visitors and residents.  It’s about cool people doing cool things.” A true culture vulture, Philippa knew there was a wealth of arts and cultural activities in DC, but no one place to go to find out what was going on.  She wanted to support the arts and show people just how rich the cultural landscape was in DC.

 

Pink Line Project Stages Unconventional Dinner with Barton Seaver, Storytellers

BIZBASH | CHANNING MULLER | AUGUST 10, 2011

The Pink Line Project, a Web site and lifestyle company focusing on the underground arts and culture of Washington, hosted the second installment of its Cuisine Contra dinner series on Monday night at the Textile Museum. The event began as a way to bring a different form of dining and culture to the city.

“We don’t always have to eat food in a traditional way and know where we’re going or what the menu is. We just go because its fun,” said Philippa Hughes, the project’s so-called “chief creative contrarian,” who noted the event’s location had previously been kept secret until it had to be delayed from its originally planned date in June. “It makes you think in a different way [about food and life].”

Click here to read the rest of the article.

 

Deliciousness is the New Green

HOLLYWOOD ON THE POTOMAC | JANET DONOVAN | AUGUST 9, 2011

 

Having a Girl Living in a Bubble Inside My Apartment for a Week Changed My Life

ARTSBLOG | JULY 29, 2011

For one week, artist Agnes Bolt moved into the home of the very sociable and curious Philippa Hughes to playfully explore the dynamics between an artist and an art collector. With a naive optimism and subtle social critique the project manifested itself with a large obtrusive structure situated within Philippa’s home in which the artist lived.

To read the rest of the article and to see a video created by Agnes click here.

 

Ex-Lawyer Learns to Dance

AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS | JULY 27, 2011

Philippa Hughes left the world of law for a creative career, seeking to inspire the people of Washington, DC. This is the story of The Pink Line Project: To see the video click here.

 

Graffiti debate shows shades of grey between art and vandalism

WTOP | GREG OTTO | JULY 22, 2011

Another panelist, Philippa Hughes, wonders how the city can embrace the culture and still promote street art when graffiti artists hone their craft illegally. “Nobody would really care about the legal street art unless both (legal and illegal) artists did it,” says Hughes, the Chief Creative Contrarian for The Pink Line Project.

Hughes often documents various street murals, because the city may paint over the murals days after they have been completed.”I kind of see it as temporary public art,” she says. “I see it as a way to bring art outside of the museums and galleries and outside of collectors’ homes so that everybody can appreciate it and enjoy it…I think it’s this perfect egalitarian way for people to have access to art.”

 

Washingtology: 5 favorite D.C. Spots

WASHINGTON POST | KYLE BALLUCK

Each week, Cultural Tourism DC asks prominent Washingtonians to share places or events that are special and unique to Washington. Pink Line Project’s chief creative contrarian, Philippa P.B. Hughes, is the latest to share her list. The garden at Dumbarton Oaks earns a spot on her list. She says that she loves that “the garden is divided into cozy rooms, each with its own look and feel.”

Read the rest of her list here.

 

Food for Thought

DC MAGAZINE | E. HARTIGAN B. DUNKINS, N. MARTELL, L. POTTER, G. POWELL, K. SHALETT, G. STONE | JUNE 28, 2011

DC may soon have more pop-ups than food trunks. Our pick? The art scene’s Philippa Hughes goes from palette to palate with Cuisine Contra, her single-session soirées featuring top-tier toques. Her inaugural event—on Valentine’s Day—featured Mike Isabella at the Mexican Cultural Institute. On Aug. 8, sustainable seafood poster child Barton Seaver will host an evening of eco-friendly fare at the Textile Museum. cuisinecontra.com

 

Play Favorites with Philippa Hughes

CLICK TRACK | ERIN WILLIAMS | JUNE 27, 2011

Every Monday, Click Track asks an interesting Washingtonian about what they’re listening to. This week we spoke with Philippa P.B. Hughes, creator of the Washington arts and culture website The Pink Line Project. Hughes likes to be intellectually stimulated by the tunes she listens to: “Anthing that can be played as background music, or is the equivalent to art that matches your sofa, bores me…I ask everyone all the time to recommend music so I end up with some really eclectic and wonderful music on my Ipod”

To see the playlist click here.

 

What’s next for the Uline Arena?

TBD | ALIA E. DASTAGIR | JUNE 22, 2011

Philippa Hughes, a local leader in the D.C. arts community who specializes in activating vacant spaces and runs an online arts calendar and blog through her brand the Pink Line Project, approached Douglas Development a few years ago to inquire about using the space for her signature Cherry Blast event.

“I know they are committed to supporting the arts, but I also know they are very busy people,” Hughes says, noting that after a couple of good conversations, she never heard back from Douglas Development and moved on.

Hughes has some inspired ideas for an event she would like to put on in the Uline this fall.

To read the rest of the article click here.

 

Live at the BYT uncapped space with Philippa Hughes

YOU ME THEM EVERYBODY | BRANDON WETHERBEE | JUNE 15, 2011

Listen to Philippa Hughes, Erin Jakson and Justin Jones live at the BYT uncapped space here.

 

DC Street Art Scene: G40 Summit is Just the Beginning

WE LOVE DC | JORDANA | JUNE 7, 2011

“The more people producing events, the better the scene,” he said, citing the positive efforts of Philippa Hughes, Ready Set DC, and other “institutions” working to build out DC’s art culture.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Supporting the Phillips

THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION | VIRGINIA K. MERRILL | MAY 18, 2011

Philippa Hughes’ ambition to demystify aesthetic experiences through informal, unexpected and personal connections makes her relationship with The Phillips Collection one of a natural synthesis of kindred spirits. Hughes says, “People want to know more about art in todays society but just don’t know how to go about it. There is a need for establishing welcoming attractions, to create that space for people to actually engage with one another.”

Playing an integral role in mounting the End of Summer White Party, Hughes did just that. But the event also transformed the way Philippa contemplates art and reinforced her belief in collaboration

 

For artist and patron, sharing space is a piece of (art)work

WASHINGTON POST | KRISTON CAPPS | MAY 16, 2011

Testing the boundaries of the artist-collector relationship, Philippa Hughes hosted Pittsburgh-based artist Agnes Bolt in her home for a week. Taking up nearly all of Hughes’ living space, Agnes was sequestered in a transparent polycarbonate enclosure. Both Agnes and Philippa spent the week adhereing to a predetermined contract of rules, which dictated the way the interacted and inevitably created tension. But by the end of the week, the artist and the collector had arrived at a mutual understanding, Hughes saying, “I Sincerely hope there’s a way she can take the material she gathered over the past seven days and turn it into something universally relevant. It wasn’t about Agnes and Philippa.”

Read the rest of the article here.

 

“Philippa Hughes to Helm Fylm Fstvl”

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER | KRISTON CAPPS | MAY 5, 2011 

Pendragwn has the incentives down but yet lacks the name recognition of other D.C. film events, such as the 48-Hour Film Festival or the aforementioned Silver Docs. That’s where Philippa Hughes (or is it PHLPPΔ HGHZZZ?) comes in. She’s been tapped to open the festivities on May 15.

A Pendragwn press release describes Hughes—who lends her Pink Line Project heft to fewer events these days (as the City Paper reported in a cover story on Hughes last October)—as the city’s “connector and gatekeeper.”

Which leads to a couple questions. Does Hughes serve as the connector for all creative genres—not just visual art, the focus for Pink Line? Could she help the beleaguered D.C. Office of Motion Picture and Television Development? And if Hughes is the gatekeeper, who is the keymaster?

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Home Story: An Art Lover’s Sanctuary

CAPITOL FILE | JACKIE KUCINICH | MAY 4, 2011

When Philippa Hughes went to London last year, she asked Zach Storm to cat-sit—and, if he felt like it, to decorate a wall in her 14th Street apartment. The result: Storm, a local artist, created a burst of colored geometric shapes that dashed across the ceiling of Hughes’ apartment, accented with little pink cotton-candy-like clouds. Hughes returned and loved it.

Storm’s mural is not alone.

To read the full article click here.

 

DC Here Now Tumblr

DC HERE NOW | APRIL 15, 2011

Our District. Our Style.
A Celebration of Washingtonians and the pleasures of getting dressed.
Featuring a photograph of Philippa Hughes.

See the tumblr here

 

Creative Uses for Vacant Spaces

THE KOJO NNAMDI SHOW | KOJO NNAMDI | APRIL 14, 2011

No neighborhood likes empty storefronts, especially up-and-coming areas. Now artists, city agencies, and landlords are teaming up to fill vacant spaces with “pop-ups” — creative temporary projects that generate visitors and buzz. We explore the art installations, performances, supper clubs and craft stores bringing life to underused urban spaces.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Philippa on Bringing Venetian Canals to Washington, DC

PEOPLE’S DISTRICT | DANNY HARRIS | APRIL 1, 2011

Philippa:…A few years ago, I had this idea: how can I bring canals to Washington, D.C.? As a child, I was always interested in The Netherlands. I had clogs and read Dutch fairy tales, and stuff like that

 

The Uncover Series Photographers

FOTODC | BY PHILIPPA HUGHES | MARCH 12, 2011

It was an unseasonably warm and sunny Sunday in February when we reviewed the portfolios from which we would select work for the Flash exhibit. I woke up that morning feeling resentful about spending such a nice weekend day inside. My resentment soon turned to pleasure! I saw a great deal of terrific work and I had some really great conversations with photographers who revealed the stories behind their images. It was difficult to narrow down the field to only five.

 

 

Pop-up retail gains favor in DC with Garment District, Mt Pleasant Temporium

THE WASHINGTON POST | DANIELLE DOUGLAS | MARCH 6, 2011

That kind of public response is more than Philippa Hughes, founder of the Pink Line Project, envisioned in championing the Temporium concept and launching the H Street site. A local cultural maven, Hughes aimed to create a viable business model for artisans to sell their wares, expand their brands and get new customers. Thanks to the retail project designer, Dana Ayanna Greaves of Artisic Aya was inspired to open her own store in Georgetown.

“People are energized by doing these temporary, cool, creative projects,” Hughes said.  “It spurs interest and gets people thinking about what’s out there.  All of these things contribute to economic development.” 

Read the rest of the article here

 

The Contradictions of Regulating “Pop-Up” Spaces

THE CITY FIX | JONNA MCKONE | FEBRUARY 22, 2011

Philippa Hughes of the Pink Line Project, part-conceiver of last summer’s library space, supports the concept, but she worries the future spaces will fit into the same mold. “We don’t necessarily have to create venues for people to sell stuff,” she said, explaining that there are other non-retail ways of enlivening a place.

Read the rest of the article here

 

The Art’s Scene ‘Agitator’ Gets the Picture

ARLINGTON FINE ARTS EXAMINER | KYLE OSBORNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2011

She’s been called an “Arts Agitator, cheerleader, advocate and promoter,” but Hughes says she simply, “Makes things happen.”  She connects artists to collectors, holds events and organizes exhibits and works to spread the word that art should be “less intimidating, more accessible.”

 

Pink Line Project Showcases DC’s Art Scene

CITY’S BEST | TOM RISEN | FEBRUARY 3, 2011 

Washington is a city of hidden treasures, and Philippa Hughes is trying make sure everyone has a chance to see the city’s full artistic potential.

 

D.C. Double Lives: Philippa Hughes Connects Washingtonians to the Arts with The Pink Line Project

CITY STREAM WASHINGTON DC | ELAINE KOUROUPAS | JANUARY 31, 2011

Her real passion stems from creating a unique, creative experience for people, especially in a city that’s better known for its dark suits and swanky steakhouses than its underground art scene.

 

The Scene: Crystal Couture Returning to the Runway

NORTHERN VIRGINIA MAGAZINE | NATALIE KAAR | JANUARY 27, 2011

For the first year ever, celebrity hosts will also add to the festivities. Pinkline founder Philippa Hughes kicks things off as the opening-night emcee.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Curating for a Cause and Jackie Cantwell

THE GEORGETOWNER | JOHN BLEE | JANUARY 12, 2011 

JC:I was looking for advice and wanted to see if Dreams For Kids could work with the Pink Line Project in some way. After putting on a show of work at Paolo’s in Georgetown I was looking for my next venture. Philippa told me to keep doing what I was doing and that I would find my way. She asked me if I wanted to write for the Pink Line Project and now I do. I learned from Philippa that you must be true to your own voice.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

 

Creative Economy Roundtable and New Years Resolutions

READYSETDC.COM | ALLYSON BEHNKE | JANUARY 5, 2011 

Back in the fall of 2009 the District Government, DC Office of Planning and the Washington DC Economic Partnership met to discuss the creative industries and their impact on the city so they held a forum called Actionomics[dc]. Nearly 200 stakeholders attended the forum that encouraged the private, non profit and public sectors to collaborate on short term opportunities via workgroups. Some of the local participating workgroup leaders included Affinity LabI-Strategy LabCultural Development CorporationThe Pink Line Project, and the Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts. This past Dec 17, 2010 Michael A, Brown, Chairperson of the Committee on Housing and Workforce Development, held a public oversight roundtable on the creation of jobs in the Districts creative economies and communities. Philippa P.B. Hughes, Chief Creative Contrarian,The Pink Line Project gave an on record testimony at the roundtable which is quoted below. She brings up excellent points in her testimony that are perfect to mull over and talk about as you ponder your New Year’s Resolutions.

 

Reflections on D.C. Art in 2011

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER ARTS DESK | JOHN ANDERSON | DECEMBER 30, 2010

The Fear of a Flatline Project Several of the pop-up galleries in the city have, in some way, been connected to the Pink Line Project. Some have been frivolous and some have been fantastic–not unlike the exhibitions of any given gallery in any given year. However, reading Kriston Capps’ WCP cover story about Pink Line founder Philippa Hughes left me with a lump in my throat: what if Pink Line flatlined? For a couple of years Pink Line has operated on a shoestring budget (not unlike the early WPA) and created copious opportunities for many D.C. artists. The result has been a little more shine in this government town… and on some occasions a little more Shiner Bock. Philippa and Pink Line are not the Alpha and Omega of the D.C. art scene, but sometimes their ubiquity makes them seem like it. If the shoestring broke, D.C. would be left limping for a while. Fortunately, it seems like the shoestring will get knotted up a bit tighter.

Read the rest of the article HERE.

 

25 Notable Washingtonians Pick Arts and Culture Highlights of 2010

WASHINGTON POST | JACQUELINE TRESCOTT & DAN ZAK | DECEMBER 28, 2010

The avalanche of end-of-year culture retrospectives scrambles our circuits, so we asked 25 notable Washingtonians to winnow down the best-of pickings for us. Here are their top picks across arts and culture – everything from fine arts to festivals, movies to movements, hyperlocal to extra-global. … PHILIPPA HUGHES Arts maven, the Pink Line Project IN D.C. | Spleen was my favorite art exhibit/experience of the year. It was by three young women who’ve just finished their MFAs. When I saw this installation, I was so amazed they were able to take this vision they had, this apocalyptic idea about our society, and create it in this ridiculous space – in the basement of this new condo building at 12th and U. It was really bold. ELSEWHERE | I saw the Murakami exhibit in Versailles and it was really mind-blowing. I’d heard that lots of people were up in arms for putting his art into this extremely ornate, gilded, traditional setting, but it just weirdly worked. It was a huge contrast: contemporary versus the Louis XIV froufrou look.

Read the rest of the article HERE

 

DC Good-Deeder Series: Philippa Hughes

DEALS FOR DEEDS | DECEMBER 21, 2010

Deals For Deeds sat down with Philippa Hughes, whose mission to inspire creativity, build community and connectivity, and open portals to art for the culturally curious, has dramatically improved and redefined DC. This week, we salute Philippa for all her great work as a Deals For Deeds Good Deeder!

 

Jones New York: Little Black Book of Career Advice

JONES NEW YORK | BY PHILIPPA PB HUGHES | DECEMBER 13, 2010

Some of the best career advice I have ever received came from “Letters to a Young Poet” in which the great German poet Rainer Maria Rilke advised: “Go inside yourself. Discover the motive that bids you to write: examine whether it sends its roots down to the deepest places of your heart, confess to yourself whether you would have to die if writing were denied you. This before all: ask yourself in the quietest hour of your night: must I write? Dig down deep into yourself for a deep answer.  And if this should be in the affirmative, if you may meet this solemn question with a strong and simple ‘I must,’ then build your life according to this necessity; your life must, right to its must unimportant and insignificant hour, become a token and witness of this impulse”  I think you could substitute any career choice for writer and Rilke’s advice would still make a lot of sense.

 

Arty Girl: Culture diva Philippa P.B. Hughes dishes about her swingy style

FASHION WASHINGTON | JENNIFER BERGER | DECEMBER 8, 2010

The founder of Pinklineproject.com an online clearing house for happenings in D.C.’s art scene — cultural provocateur Philippa P.B. Hughes (shown on a swing at her cool Logan loft) spends her nights gallery hopping and her days organizing salons and events. Her eclectic style (vintage dresses, Phillip Lim tops, funky boots) earned her FW’s 2010 Most Fashionable Washingtonian Award. The prize was awarded Dec. 1 in a place as chic as Hughes: aboard an OpenSkies all-business class flight to Paris. Afterwards, she and her guests spent four fashion-filled days in the City of Light courtesy of award sponsor OpenSkies. We caught up with her about pieces she’s loving now.

 

“Dine and Dish” (pages 68-70)

WASHINGTON LIFE MAGAZINE | BY PHILIPPA PB HUGHES | NOVEMBER 9, 2010

“We need to develop a more culturally curious audience who ill become consumers who will then foster local artists.  We have to give people more accessible points of entry.  You can’t just say ‘go to the Kennedy Center.’” It’s too intimidating.  This can actually keep people from enjoying the art scene.” -Philippa P.B. Hughes.

 

 

Capital Gains

MODERN LUXURY | NOVEMBER 9, 2010

In a dark time, we are illuminating the city,” says FotoWeek DC founder Theo Adamstein, referring to the nighttime projections on buildings throughout Washington during the festival.  The event has become one of the premier photography happenings in the world in three short years.  However, he could have just as easily been referring to a trio of nonprofits- all holding seminal events this month- who’ve not only survived the recession, but are providing more services than ever to the city’s up- and-coming artists.

 

10 Artsy Halloween Costumes that pass Hirshhorn After Hours Muster

TED ARTS | MAURA JUDKIS | OCTOBER 26, 2010

Hirshhorn After Hours has prohibited costumes for the sake of protecting the museum’s art- and also to keep the event from turning into just another Halloween party.  So leave your Sexy Hirshhorn Bubble costume (lingerie, balloon) at home. You can still dress up though- provided your costume doesn’t actually look like a costume.  Try going as one of these art world figures that are more mildly attired.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Philippa Hughes has had enough!

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER | KRISTON CAPPS | OCTOBER 25, 2010 

The subject of last week’s cover story could be excused for figuring that the worst was behind her.  But today, as DC hostess Philippa Hughes was making her way to a meeting, a man attempted to mug her at 13th and Q streets NW.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

The Philippa Collection

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER | KRISTON CAPPS | OCTOBER 22, 2010

Hughes may well be the perfect point of entry to the arts community: she’s fashionable, but not threateningly so, she never drops art theory, and she’s indefatigably chirpy. Her breezy grin keeps everyone comfortable, from art-scene purists to party-hopping dilettantes. And while the overlap between Philippa and her brand might suggest someone who’s been plotting for years to make the scene, her easy persona hints at how she actually came about it: gradually, as a by-product of other ambitions.

To read the full article click here.

 

 

Blogatique with Ananda Leeke

ANANDA LEEKE SHOW | ANANDA LEEKE | OCTOBER 20, 2010

Join Ananda Leeke for part two of per National Arts and Humanities Month celebration featuring a conversation with Philippa Hughes, founder of The Pink Line Project.

Read the rest of the article here

 

Five Things: Philippa Hughes

READYSETDC | ALLYSON | OCTOBER 8, 2010

What do DC creatives need on a daily basis? We decided to ask them.  Five Things answers the question: What five things do you need everyday? This week we spoke with Philippa Hughes, the Chief Contrarian of the Pink Line Project.

 

Two Tickets to the Gun Art Show

TBD ARTS | MAURA JUDKIS | SEPTEMBER 28, 2010 

Anderson and Oberndorfer are both professors at Prince George’s County Community College, but they learned that their projects might overlap through Philippa Hughes of the Pink Line Project.  Oberndorfer had originally spoken to Hughes about the gun store for her Temporium, a pop-up store with wares created by artists.  When Anderson posted on Facebook that his grant would make his own gun store project possible, Hughes suggested the two talk.

 

D.C. Salons Satisfy Art Curiosity

GW HATCHET | FARIMA ALIDADI | SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 

According to art collector Philippa Hughes, you don’t have to move to New York or Los Angeles to make it in the arts world. Even the nation’s capital has an outlet for artistic expression, although it’s often overlooked.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

ART: Black and Collecting, Part I

THE COUCH SESSIONS | SIM1ONTHARUN | September 15, 2010 

Part of what I want to create with my group is to be as creative as possible when we have these events. That’s why I give Philippa a lot of credit that she has brought a new dialogue to the arts scene. She thinks about her events and brings an element that wouldn’t normally be added, so I really think that’s a good thing. To really get people out the house, it’s really gotta be unique instead of the same ole sippin’ on some wine or whatever the case may be.

Read the rest of the article here

 

Why art galleries are embracing the internet

BBC WORLD NEWS AMERICA | JANE O’BRIEN | SEPTEMBER 9, 2010

To view video click here.

 

Insider’s Guide to Buying Art for Less

SOUTHERN LIVING | CHRISTIE FINDLAY | SEPTEMBER 2010

Look at the Arts scene around the District and you’re bound to find Philippa Hughes involved–serving on commissions, panels, advisory boards and action committees all aimed at a single goal: supporting the arts. Her own organization, The Pink Line Project, calls itself the “catalyst for the culturally curious,” which translates into encouraging emerging art collectors.

 

DC Library Hosts Temporary Boutique

THE WASHINGTON POST | AKEYA DICKSON | AUGUST 12, 2010 

The idea of the starving artist holed up in a cramped living-and-work space, not knowing when the next paycheck will roll in is romanticized and dated at best. At least that’s Philippa Hughes’s philosophy and why she uses her networking savvy to help emerging artists embrace enterprising ideas.

“I want them to start thinking more entrepreneurial,” said the lawyer-turned-cultural connoisseur. “But I also think everyone should play to their strengths. So they should be creating, and I make the connections. I am good at going to a lot of bureaucratic meetings and making nice.”

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Painting D.C. Pink: Philippa P.B. Hughes, Local Art Provocateur, Vintage Clothing Fan

EXPRESS NIGHT OUT | MARGE ELY | AUGUST 6, 2010 

If you’ve hit an offbeat gallery opening, performance art happening or indie documentary film fest in the past few years, it’s highly likely you found out about it via Pink Line Project. The brainchild of lawyer-turned-cultural gatekeeper Philippa P.B. Hughes details cool-kid events and exhibits around town.

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DC’s culture critics get some of their own medicine at Pink Line Project event

SWEDISH SCENE | SUSANNA | AUGUST 4, 2010

The Pink Line Project summoned art lovers from across the city to the Gibson Guitar Showroom across from the Verizon Center in downtown Washington Tuesday evening, Aug. 3 to critique the creations of some of the most well-known DC culture critics. People were invited to judge the creations of familiar Washington culture critics as they competed to make the best art with Legos, Playdoh, Etch a Sketch, finger painting and other fun materials from childhood.

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A Surfer Builds her Core Strength

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL | JEN MURPHY | AUGUST 2, 2010

 

Crushing It!

Last night we attended the first Blue Crush Summer Celebration to Crush Colon Cancer at new Adams Morgan strength and yoga center STROGA, hosted by Chris4Life Foundation, in partnership with the Pink Line Project and Pamela’s Punch.

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A Monumental Change

TOWN & COUNTRY | ANNIE GROER | NOVEMBER 2009

…The next morning, I returned to 14th Street to pop in on Philippa Hughes- avid surfer, non-practicing lawyer, champion of under-the-radar artists and a recent Fenty appointee to the DC Commission of Arts and Humanities. Walking out onto the terrace of the loft where she entertains frequently, she reminisced: “On election night, 14th and U was where so many people gravitated. It was so exciting. It felt like the center of everything new and progressive and hopeful.”

 

Temporary Pop Up on H

THE HILL IS HOME | JEAN DEMAYO | JULY 27, 2010 

I think if there was a contest today for coolest girl in town Philippa Hughes would win it by a landslide. The Pink Line Project, which began as a way for her, an art lover, to engage meaningfully with DC’s art community has grown into citywide phenomena. Where there is art in this town Pink Line is there.

 

Jeffrey Cudlin Dancing as Philippa

DANCERS IN DIALOGUE | KATE MATTINGLY | JULY 3, 2010

Philippa Hughes, founder of Pink Line Project, appears in photographs in the exhibit, was one of the art luminaries Cudlin approached to take part in the project, and is someone who inspires me with her ability to support and promote creative thinking. 

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Jeffry Cudlin’s ‘By Request’ 

THE WASHINGTON POST | JESSICA DAWSON | JULY 2, 2010 

On a Friday afternoon in early June, Cudlin donned a short pink animal-print dress and strappy silver heels; the aim of his cross-dressing was to impersonate Philippa Hughes, a popular District art impresario and collector (and also a friend of mine). As Hughes, Cudlin visited a handful of the city’s top galleries and danced. He writhed, butt cheeks exposed, for whoever was willing to watch

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Best Window on the Art Scene

THE WASHINGTONIAN | JULY 1, 2010 

Philippa P.B. Hughes’ pink scooter parked in front of an art event is a sign something cool is going on. Since founding Pink Line Project in 2007, Hughes has emerged as Washington’s master at creative gatherings, from mob-like art parties in warehouses to walking tours of outdoor installations. At the heart of the project’s programming is Salon Contra, modeled after 18th century French salons. Twice a month, 35 to 40 art lovers convene at Hughes’ U Street condo for cozy conversations led by artists, collectors, and curators.

 

NEA Arts talks with Philippa

NEA ARTS MAGAZINE | PAULETTE BEETE | JULY 1, 2010

Town and Country has dubbed her “a champion of under-the-radar artists” while the Washington Post has called her “an arch-organizer of all things arty.” If you ask Philippa P.B. Hughes herself, she’d probably answer with her job title at the Pink Line Project–Chief Creative Contrarian.

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PHOTOS: Digital Capital Week Opening at Blagden Alley

BRIGHTEST YOUNG THINGS | SVETLANA LEGETIC | JUNE 14, 2010

This past Friday, IStrategy labs partnered up with Pinkline, Shiny Heart Ventures and Palantir to kick the week off in style using the Longview Gallery/Blagden Alley as the backdrop.

2000 or so people showed up and fingerpainted, listened to Matthew Hemerlein, Ryan Holladay, Chris Nitti and an assortment of other quality DC musicians, drank beer and wine and networked their Friday asses off at this ultimate of DC social and media events: where you go to say you went and probably tweet about it in the meantime.

 

Photos: Inciting Art-Gallery Dance Parties with Jeffry Cudlin

WASHINGTON CITY PAPER | WILL SOMMER | JUNE 10, 2010

 

 

08 Fall Arts Preview: The Cultural Crowd’s Refreshing Faces: Remaking the Scene

THE WASHINGTON POST | LAVANYA RAMANATHAN | SEPTEMBER 14, 2008

Young and influential. Those alone are sexy adjectives to us, but add the word “artistic” and, well, you have hit on a combination that makes our hearts flutter. For this year’s Fall Arts Preview, we went looking for young people who are shaping Washington arts. The Style & Arts staff chose people with fresh energy and ideas who’ve proved to be influential on the scene – be they curators or composers, performers, painters or festival founders.

Philippa P.B. Hughes, 39

Art collector and founder of the Pink Line Project

It took just over a year — a couple of events, really, to hear her tell it — for Philippa Hughes to emerge in late 2007 as the belle of Washington’s arts scene. Neither artist nor gallerist, Hughes is a lawyer and lobbyist-turned-art-collector who has imbued Washington’s art scene with a New York-style cool by using a deceptively simple idea: host visual and performance artists in edgy, vacant storefront spaces or at home; hang a screen, show projection art, get a DJ, set up a bar and wait for the hipsters to arrive.

Her blog, Hoogrrl.com, and the Web site for her arts-support organization, the Pink Line Project (Pinkline.org), both muse about art, pass on news and promote Washington events with similar vibes (and the number of such events has only grown since Hughes moved here from her native Richmond several years ago). She hosts invite-only salons for creative types in her 1,000-square foot condo with a giant deck on 14th Street NW and doesn’t seem to have a day job, per se — she cites “good investments” and other factors. She calls herself an “arts activist.”

Her name attached to an ever-growing list of bashes, Hughes plans to narrow her focus to launching a group for art collectors to remove some of the mystery around buying and supporting art: “I’m going to step back and define.”